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Coral is Block 24 of Farmer’s Wife 1930’s Sampler Quilt

After the trauma that was Belle it’s nice to get back to something I’m remotely comfortable with, triangles. Today’s block sorely tempted me to ditch my rule about sticking to the same fabric numbers as the blocks in the book and think about using a special little print in the “peep hole” of the star. In the end I consoled myself with using one of my favourite pieces of Sarah Jane‘s Children at Play prints.

I must confess I found the version of this block in the book a little underwhelming, but now having made two (and seen sneak peeks of the Official Bloggers versions) I feel like this block is the quiet achiever of the bunch. There’s so much fun you can have with the star and then the cut out square. I love it.

In this tutorial I’m going to be showing you how to reduce the seams and bulk in this block (and increase your chances of accurate points) by showing you how to make it with flying geese units instead of half square triangles. I’ve made it using the From Marti Michell Patchwork Templates Set A and From Marti Michell Patchwork Templates Set C sets but I’ve also provided the replacement piece measurements for those of you using the cutting templates and rotary cutting instructions included in the book.

I hope you have as much fun with this block as I did and I can’t wait to see the version you make!
Farmer's Wife 1930's Sampler Quilt - Learn to make the blocks with Angie Wilson of GnomeAngel.com

Tutorial: Block #24 “Coral”

Farmer's Wife 1930's Sampler Quilt - Learn to make the blocks with Angie Wilson of GnomeAngel.comGeneral Information

If you’d like to know “My Top 10 Beginners Patchworking Tools” you can find them by clicking here.

Measurements for the pieces needed to construct this block will not be provided in this tutorial. It is a pre-requiste of making this block that you have a copy of the book, The Farmer’s Wife 1930s Sampler Quilt: Inspiring Letters from Farm Women of the Great Depression and 99 Quilt Blocks That Honor Them. Measurements can be found in this book and it’s associated media.

The Farmer’s Wife 1930s Sampler Quilt: Inspiring Letters from Farm Women of the Great Depression and 99 Quilt Blocks That Honor Them by Laurie Aaron Hird – available from: Amazon | Pink Door Fabrics | Fat Quarter Shop | The Quilting Company | Interweave (Affiliate Links)

On Point Blocks

Please note I am not doing my blocks on-point. If you are fussy cutting your blocks please be mindful of your fabric placement so that the motif will sit correctly if you decide to put your blocks on-point.

Conversion Chart

You can find the From Marti Michell Patchwork Template Conversion Charts by clicking here.

Helpful Links & Videos

Marti Michell shows you how to cut using your ruler and templates:

For another video on this template set click here.

How to Make the Block

General advice:

  • Tolerance Levels: you need to decide what is an acceptable tolerance level for “mistakes”. For example if your blocks are consistently 6¼” instead of 6.5″ are you ok with this. Or if your seams matching are less than an eight of an inch “off” are you ok with this. There’s no hard or fast rule and it’s different for everyone, so remember it’s your quilt so make your decision for you.
  • Press your seams at each step. Click here for a great article on how to press your seams for patchwork.
  • You can iron and starch your fabric prior to cutting. I also starch when pressing bulky seams.
  • When pinning, pin away from you so that you don’t move your pieces when pinning.
  • Where possible I chain piece all the pieces I can in one step. If you’re unsure of what chain piecing is, click here for a tutorial on how to do it. However, for the purpose of the tutorials I will step you through all the seams individually.

Special Note: The instructions on the conversion chart provide two methods of construction using the templates. One to keep the exact seams of the block and the other for using the templates to create a block that looks like the block in the book but reduces the seams. This tutorial is showing you how to make the “cheats” version of the block using the From Marti Michell Patchwork Templates Set A to reduce the seams but retain the look of the block. Technically, doing it this way means that it’s not the same block as the book but I’m not the quilt police so you make the block however you want. I just wanted to let you know in case sticking to the exact blocks was important to you.

1. Use your rotary cutter and ruler to cut all pieces required for the block as per the instructions in the book. Cutting instructions can be found on the disc that came with the book. Block directions are located on page 183. You can also use the cutting instructions on the conversion chart. I have used the From Marti Michell Patchwork Templates Set AFrom Marti Michell Patchwork Templates Set C and accompanying conversion chart to cut all my pieces for this block. I am using the alternative method for making this block on the conversion chart. The advantage of this method is less bulk from seams and less opportunities for your points to go missing.

Tip: Be mindful of how you cut your fabrics if you are using a directional print for this block. If possible, and your desire, aim to keep the direction of the print traveling in the same direction for all pieces.

Farmer's Wife 1930's Sampler Quilt - Learn to make the blocks with Angie Wilson of GnomeAngel.com2. Join one 24D to 24B (the middle of the star) as per diagram 2.

3. Join the remaining 24D to 24B (as per diagram 3) to make Unit A.

Farmer's Wife 1930's Sampler Quilt - Learn to make the blocks with Angie Wilson of GnomeAngel.com4. Join the remaining 24A to Unit A (as per diagram 4) to make Unit B.

Farmer's Wife 1930's Sampler Quilt - Learn to make the blocks with Angie Wilson of GnomeAngel.com5. Now we’ll make the 4 flying geese units. For the purpose of this tutorial I’ll show you how to make the first one and then show you all 4 done. Join one 24C to A4 (note this is different from the book templates as I have used Template A4 of From Marti Michell Patchwork Templates Set A to replace the Half Square Triangle units given in the books method of construction).

If you wish to use this method but you do not have the Marti Michell template set you can cut a 3 6/8th inch square and then cut in half diagonally from one corner to the other to make 2 triangles. You will need to do this twice as you need 4 triangles.

Tip: The engineered corners of the templates will help you to line up the edges of your seams. The arrows in diagram 5a point to where the flat corners of the pieces will line up to make your piecing easier.Farmer's Wife 1930's Sampler Quilt - Learn to make the blocks with Angie Wilson of GnomeAngel.com6. Join one 24C to A4 as per diagram 6a. This will complete your flying geese unit.

Tip: The engineered corners of the templates will help you to line up the edges of your seams. The arrows in diagram 6a point to where the flat corners of the pieces will line up to make your piecing easier.Farmer's Wife 1930's Sampler Quilt - Learn to make the blocks with Angie Wilson of GnomeAngel.com7. Repeat steps 5 & 6 three more times with the remaining 24C and A4 pieces to create a total of 4 flying geese units; Unit C, Unit D, Unit E and Unit F.

8. Join 24B to Unit C to make the top row. Join Unit E to Unit B to make the middle row. Join 24B to Unit F to make the bottom row.

Farmer's Wife 1930's Sampler Quilt - Learn to make the blocks with Angie Wilson of GnomeAngel.com9. Join 24B to Unit C to complete the top row. Join Unit E to Unit B to complete the middle row. Join 24B to Unit F to complete the bottom row.

Farmer's Wife 1930's Sampler Quilt - Learn to make the blocks with Angie Wilson of GnomeAngel.com10. Join the bottom row to the middle row.

Tip: Pay careful attention to the seam lines – this is where the impact comes from. I pinned in the seams (see diagram 10) so that I knew they were lined up.

Farmer's Wife 1930's Sampler Quilt - Learn to make the blocks with Angie Wilson of GnomeAngel.com11. Join the top row to your block. Stand back and admire your handiwork, you just made Coral. Booyah!

Tip: Those of you paying attention to my block will notice that my bottom on-point square doesn’t match up “just” right on the right hand side. I unpicked this seam twice and couldn’t get it to work so in the end I decided to put it aside and maybe come back to it later. Or, you know, I might just leave it and let the quilting hide it for me in the end product.

Tip: Pay careful attention to the seam lines – this is where the impact comes from. I pinned in the seams (see diagram 7a) so that I knew they were lined up.

Accompanying Farmer’s Wife 1930’s Sampler Quilt Block Tutorial

When I hosted the 2015 Farmer’s Wife 1930’s Sampler Quilt Sew-Along I had some blogging friends jump in and make the blocks and share their thoughts, tips, tricks and alternative fabric choices with everyone. These tutorials provided a great way for participants to find some new bloggers to follow, learn more about the craft we all love and get some alternative ideas for fabrics and colours.

You can find this blocks accompanying tutorial here*: Erin @ Why Not Sew

*Please note: Where possible I will link to the accompanying tutorial, however given the time that has elapsed since the first event in some cases the tutorial may be missing. In this case I will link to the blogger directly so that you can check out their work.

Book Details

T2131_FW1930SQ_COV.indd

The Farmer’s Wife 1930s Sampler Quilt: Inspiring Letters from Farm Women of the Great Depression and 99 Quilt Blocks That Honor Them by Laurie Aaron Hird – available from: Amazon | Pink Door Fabrics | Fat Quarter Shop | The Quilting Company | Interweave (Affiliate Links)

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase those items through my links I will earn a very small commission. You will not pay more when buying a product through my link, in fact in some cases I can offer you a better price via an affiliate link. I will not recommend something that I do not use myself. These commissions help me keep being able to provide you with great content for free. Thank you, in advance for your support!

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Comments

  1. Angie…
    I was trying to figure out what you weren’t quite happy with as far as the point in your bottom right hand corner…
    hmmmm…I really can’t see anything wrong except …..hesitating…..you see, I’m not a seasoned quilter as you are, I only started 2 years ago but this is all I do all day long….so here I go boldly….we all know just how important it is to press after we sew a seam…did you know that you can manipulate the direction and size of your points by the direction which you press? I see that you are doing the new, modern thing of opening up your seams…why? yes, they do make your block look pretty and lie flat but…you can’t manipulate your points this way and…when you quilt your top and you stitch over this seam and the needle just happens to go right into the middle of the seam where you opened it up instead of ironing it to its side…pop!…your thread breaks and the seam opens up and well…you now have to fix that seam or hope it holds up in the wash…just a thought…I wonder if you tried to iron the seam to one side or the other if you could fix the problem…honestly though…I can’t see it. 🙂
    Please forgive me for correcting you in any way…this is just a tip I learned after trying to iron seams open and not being satisfied with my work and then hearing a professional long arm quilter explain in quite upset tones how she hates this new trend and will not guarantee her work nor stop to fix others’ work any longer when they choose to iron their seams in this manner. No…she’s not an old fogey kind of lady at all…quite young actually and a very very great quilter here in Tucson, AZ who is always in high demand. You may edit my post here in any way you wish or erase it all together…I won’t mind…just a tip from one quilter on the other side of the globe to you…and btw…I do learn quite a bit from reading your blog and I admire all your quilts!
    blessings…Mary Hope

  2. I am hesitating about joining in! I need some enncouragementZ. Yes, I have sewed forever and always wish I was a better piecer.seems the are a lot of people that can be followed for help, to answer questions etc. I’d like to stick to one or I’ll get overwhelmed. I subscribe to your newsletter and love it. If I follow your blog will I get the info I need to make it through. Are you OK with questions? I see everyday so I thinkkbibcan donut….,I just need to know I have someone by my side, so to speak!
    Sur

  3. Another great block! I didn’t make Belle yet (I confess the y-seams scare me a bit and although I love your easier block construction I love the look of the ‘original’ layout so much I might give in to the y-seam) but Coral looks a lot friendlier and I think I’ll sew this one first:-)

  4. Never feel guilty about letting your children crawl in bed with you to sleep. We’ve always allowed it when the kids were little and having a bad night and just a couple of weeks ago I had the pleasure of having a slumber party in my bed with my 2 1/2 year granddaughter when my husband and her parents were all out of town for the weekend. The little warm snuggling body next to mine brought some of the best contentment a parent/grandparent could ever experience.