Vintage Daydreams Quilt Reveal

Vintage Daydream - Patchwork by Angie Wilson of GnomeAngel.com. Quilting by Gemma Jackson. Pattern, Vintage by Camille Roskelly. Feature fabric Daydreams by Kate Spain. Background fabric, Kona by Robert Kaufman. Quilting in Aurifil. Edge-to-edge pattern by Karlee Porter.

In May 2104 I wrote about starting my version of Camille Roskelley’s Vintage quilt from her book Simply Retro. I was supposed to finish the quilt in that month, but I’m ashamed to say it took me 12 months to finish. I hand stitched the binding down in May 2015 and it’s taken me this long to get photos and share it. (Winter has not been kind in the quilt photo department!) I gave up on getting amazing photos and settled for just getting photos otherwise it might be another 12 months before it’s on the blog! I called this quilt “Vintage Daydreams” as a nod to the two ladies who designed the two key elements.

I absolutely adore Kate Spain’s Daydreams range of fabrics and I was so excited to use them in this project, but I feel like this quilt is a good example of how sometimes as much as you love something it just doesn’t work. I decided to use this range for this project because the blocks are so large and I thought it would give me a really good amount of the fabrics in each block so I could just soak in their beauty while snuggling under my quilt. And the blocks do give you a big punch of the fabrics, but my choice of background fabric and quilting really do nothing to make the most of these amazing fabrics.

The other thing not working in my favour is that I managed to screw up cutting a couple of the fat quarters (which were some of my favourites in the range) I’d planned to use and so I had to use more of the blender fabrics in the range then I would have liked. Blenders are great when you’re trying to find a way to use multiple prints, but I don’t think in this instance they work that great on their own.

Vintage Daydream - Patchwork by Angie Wilson of GnomeAngel.com. Quilting by Gemma Jackson. Pattern, Vintage by Camille Roskelly. Feature fabric Daydreams by Kate Spain. Background fabric, Kona by Robert Kaufman. Quilting in Aurifil. Edge-to-edge pattern by Karlee Porter.

I let HUBBY pick from a couple of different background options for this quilt because I wanted to make a quilt for our bed and thought this would be a good way to include him in the process. He chose Kona Cotton Sky and at the time I wanted to go a different direction and I went with his choice. Lesson learned – trust your gut! Technically the colour goes with the fabrics, but it’s just made this quilt feel washed out. For my liking, this quilt is lacking some punch. It just doesn’t “feel right”.

Vintage Daydream - Patchwork by Angie Wilson of GnomeAngel.com. Quilting by Gemma Jackson. Pattern, Vintage by Camille Roskelly. Feature fabric Daydreams by Kate Spain. Background fabric, Kona by Robert Kaufman. Quilting in Aurifil. Edge-to-edge pattern by Karlee Porter.

Gemma (of Pretty Bobbins) quilted this for me and I chose to do something a little out of my comfort zone and went with a pattern I probably wouldn’t have normally picked. It doesn’t work with this patchwork pattern.  This isn’t a reflection on the pattern, the quilter or the quilt – it just doesn’t work and sometimes there’s more value in things not working right then when they do.

Vintage Daydream - Patchwork by Angie Wilson of GnomeAngel.com. Quilting by Gemma Jackson. Pattern, Vintage by Camille Roskelly. Feature fabric Daydreams by Kate Spain. Background fabric, Kona by Robert Kaufman. Quilting in Aurifil. Edge-to-edge pattern by Karlee Porter.

I bound the quilt in a mix of two fabrics from the range and I really like how it came out – it’s the same print, just two colour ways.  I backed it in a print that I picked up on clearance and thought went lovely with the colours on the front.

Vintage Daydream - Patchwork by Angie Wilson of GnomeAngel.com. Quilting by Gemma Jackson. Pattern, Vintage by Camille Roskelly. Feature fabric Daydreams by Kate Spain. Background fabric, Kona by Robert Kaufman. Quilting in Aurifil. Edge-to-edge pattern by Karlee Porter.

The quilts not horrible, it’s just not rocketing to the top of my favourites list. Since finishing it I’ve seen a really amazing scrappy version of this quilt pattern on Instagram and it makes me wish I’d thought of it. It works so well in scraps.

We’re currently sleeping under this quilt and it’s giving such a lovely hit of summer to our dark winter days. I still really love the big prints in this range and I know that I’ll be tracking some more down to add it back into my stash. For what this quilt lacks in the punch department it’s taught me some valuable lessons in what I love in quilts and what I need to avoid in future.

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6 Comments

  1. Anita L August 5, 2015 at 4:29 pm

    Isn’t it weird how sometimes you can finish a quilt in a week and others take years? That’s been my experience anyway. I don’t know why that is. I think the quilt looks great! This pattern is still on my bucket list. It sounds like winter is really getting you down over there. I hope you get some relief from it soon. I am not in a hurry for it to return to my side of the world that’s for sure. We picked our supper from the garden tonight. I will miss that so much in a few months.

  2. Emma Hill July 31, 2015 at 1:43 pm

    Every quilt I have made has taught me a lesson – about fabric placement, about choosing the right scale of fabric for the block size, even the ideal width for straight line quilting. It’s always hard to finish them when they don’t turn out as fantastic as they looked when you first planned them in your head!

  3. HopeTN July 31, 2015 at 10:53 am

    It’s tough when we’re disappointed by what we make, but at least you can still enjoy the fabrics, even if the overall effect in the quilt doesn’t please you. I’ve got a few niggles with the UFO I’m currently working on finishing, places where there just isn’t enough contrast or the print makes things look wonky… You live and you learn 🙂

    I wonder how your quilt would look with some big stitch hand quilting in a thick, dark thread outlining the print fabrics (i.e. in the background sections). It might add a bit of ‘punch’?

    1. Cassandra July 31, 2015 at 12:18 pm

      Hope’s idea is fabulous!! It really just needs some definition between the block prints and background, some elements of the more pictorial fabrics are swallowed up in the background.

      That being said, its still gorgeous and I would steal it in a heartbeat.

      I know who has some Daydream meterage in stock if you need it.

  4. Kirsty@Bonjour July 31, 2015 at 10:53 am

    Sometimes it’s hard to reconcile what something looks like in our head (before we start) and what it looks like once it appears in the real world, I am always much happier with what I’ve created when I forget the former – and I think you will be too because this really is a lovely quilt. Don’t let your imaginary quilt ruin your real one!